Skip to main content









Series Archive

CN15

Christina Marsh and Mason Smith's picture
Christina Marsha and Mason Smith
Wednesday, April 18, 2018
Perspectives
At Collective Next, we speak regularly about the importance of facilitating structural change. And typically, the structures to which we refer are organizational in nature. But, can facilitating collaborative dialogue play a key role when the structures in question are not organizational but physical – concrete, steel, and wood? In fact, large-scale building projects, such as those in corporate, institutional and academic settings, benefit immensely when diverse stakeholders are drawn together during the architectural design process. In partnership with Boston-based architecture firm, Atelier et Alia, Collective Next has been exploring opportunities to interject collaborative, facilitated moments into the visioning, design, and review phases of large-scale architectural projects.
More
Katherine Gorman's picture
Katherine Gorman
Monday, April 9, 2018
Perspectives
Shared stories unite people. They build community. We human beings have communicated values through storytelling from our earliest times. Even as technology lets us work in increasingly distributed communities, we can still harness the medium of storytelling to draw our organizations together. We can do this by creating organizational podcasts—communal podcasts—that convey powerful stories about our collective identity. Through these commonly held narratives, we can foster a strong sense of shared purpose and belonging.
More
Hamilton Ray's picture
Hamilton Ray
Monday, April 2, 2018
Perspectives
When a well-established company undertakes a large-scale overhaul, defining their strategy is only the first step. Equally critical is inspiring new and existing leadership to embrace this change. And leaders must be armed with an understanding of how to enable the strategy and rally their teams behind it. This process of readying leadership to successfully implement a new strategy is often protracted, taking months—even years—with mixed results. This begs the question: Is there another way?
More
Marsha Dunn's picture
Marsha Dunn
Monday, March 19, 2018
Perspectives
Collective Next turns 15 this year. In honor of this momentous anniversary, we’re sharing some thoughts from our co-founders—and amazing husband and wife team—Matt Saiia and Sarah Shrimplin. I asked them recently why and how it all began, their focus in running the company, and where we might find ourselves another fifteen years from now.
More

Learning in a Modern Age

Hamilton Ray and Dave Rutley's picture
Hamilton Ray and Dave Rutley
Wednesday, February 28, 2018
Final Reflections
We have devoted an entire year to discussing Meaningful Change and how best to achieve it. What you may have noticed is that we did not talk about change management. Why? Quite simply, we think about the nature of change in entirely different terms. Change isn’t something you can manage; it is closer to a force of nature. You can foster it, cultivate it, but you can’t control it. It doesn’t have a start and end date, and it isn’t managed through a process. It is our belief that you enable change by focusing on the human capacity—proclivity even—for transformation.
More
Marsha Dunn's picture
Marsha Dunn
Thursday, January 25, 2018
Interview
Collective Next’s leadership and development programs embrace a model of 21st Century leadership development that maximizes the potential of self-directed learning. We believe—and have seen time and again—that leadership skills develop and thrive most effectively under conditions of autonomy, the pursuit of mastery and a well-defined purpose. Collective Next-ers Kris Henry and Mason Smith are here to discuss the challenges and benefits of approaching leadership development in these ways.
More
Marsha Dunn's picture
Marsha Dunn
Wednesday, January 10, 2018
Interview
Emily Demarest is responsible for designing trainings for physicians and care teams to successfully run clinical trials. Recognizing the high-stakes and incredible opportunity in front of her, Emily has introduced a series of innovative approaches to her company’s (IQVIA’s) training design. In her capacity as Director of Event Design and Production, she has abandoned endless PowerPoint presentations, favoring the strategic use of visuals and interactivity to maximize the learning experience.
More
Kristen Bailey's picture
Kristen Bailey
Tuesday, December 19, 2017
Perspectives
Girls and women are taught to be perfect, while boys and men are taught to be brave. Perfectionism has its value, of course, but it can also be a paralyzing preoccupation, especially in fields that demand constant innovation. This was a core message at a Women’s Leadership Summit I facilitated this year and it shaped my approach to the innovation activity I was leading for women at the summit.
More
Marsha Dunn's picture
Marsha Dunn
Friday, December 1, 2017
Interview
David Small is a master at designing user-led experiences that communicate complex ideas. His company Small Design Firm develops self-guided installations that harness beauty, playfulness, and emotion to create lasting impressions of vital ideas. I had the opportunity to talk to David about his design work, and in particular, about the fine art of letting the material—rather than the designer—lead the way, a lesson he learned as a student at the MIT Media Lab.
More
Matt Saiia's picture
Matt Saiia
Monday, November 13, 2017
Think Piece
Can a group of Tamil-speaking 12 year-olds in a south Indian village teach themselves the biotechnology of DNA replication in English? According to Sugata Mitra’s research, the answer is a resounding YES! Several years ago, Mitra was awarded the TED Prize for his vision of “building a school in the cloud.” Having installed unmanned computers in locations ranging from a slum wall in Delhi to a tree in remote India, Mitra documented children teaching themselves computer, language, and advanced science skills. Mitra’s conclusion: we can level the learning playing field by providing any group of children a computer and internet access plus three ingredients: encouragement, space to self-organize, and a wondrous question—how did the world begin? how will it end? what happens to the air we breat
More

Pages